The Harsh Reality of Slums in Luis Buñuel’s “Los Olvidados”

olvidados

“The great modern cities: New York, Paris, London, hide behind their magnificent building homes of misery that shelter malnourished children without hygiene, without schools, a harvest of future delinquency. The society tries to correct this evil, but the success of its effort is very limited. Only in a future where children’s and adolescent’s rights are vindicated will they be useful for society. Mexico, the great modern city is not an exception to this universal rule. That’s why this film based on facts from real life is not optimistic, and it leaves the solution to the problem to the society’s progressive forces” _The opening statement to “Los Olvidados”

Luis Buñuel directed “Los Olvidados”, aka “The Young and the Damned” or “The Forgotten Ones”, an unapologetic depiction of children living in the crime infested slums of Mexico City. Apparently, this film was the main inspiration behind “City of God”, and I can see how. It is just as brutal, if not more so. When it was released in 1950, “Los Olvidados” didn’t last more than three days in theaters due to the outrage it caused. The press, government, and upper class audiences were furious with the film. They labeled it as bad publicity for Mexico and Third World countries. “Los Olvidados” was simply being brutally honest in its portrayal of the never-ending cycle of street violence in the slums of a city.

Buñuel doesn’t shy away from exposing his audience to this cruel rotten world, we are forced to watch old men sexually abuse young girls, slum children beating up cripples for the heck of it, and kids stabbing one another for a few pesos. This is one of the bleakest films ever made about poverty and street children. It is an under-seen work of art that deserves to be mentioned amongst the greats. I hope one day Criterion restores the film to its original glory, so it could receive the respect it deserves. “The Young and the Damned” is an unflinching look at hell on earth; once seen, it will never be forgotten.

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