Film as a Reflection in “Through the Olive Trees”

The third film in the ambitious Koker trilogy is a delightful viewing experience filled with pleasant surprises and cameos at every corner. The entries in this multi-layered trilogy are short and sweet, but when consumed together, you get an explosion of flavours that only a master chef could put together. “Through the Olive Trees”, for example, is fairly simple as a stand-alone film, but when you attempt to analyze its place within the trilogy, you’ll find it to be incredibly complex.

This tale follows a romance unfolding in the midst of the making of “And Life Goes On”.  It is a poem about love in the countryside and focuses on what went behind a single scene in the previous film. Hossein Rezai, who had an incredibly memorable scene in “And Life Goes On”, takes center stage as a stonemason in love with the girl he’s sharing the screen with.

I think the reason Kiarostami was interweaving fiction and reality was to present film as a reflection of life. You realise that there is nothing more precious, artistic and beautiful than life itself. “Through the Olive Tree” rounds up one of the most fulfilling trilogies in art-house history. It will be studied and cherished for years to come.

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