Melancholic Reflection in Martin Scorsese’s “The Irishman”

Martin Scorsese brings forth a gangster film we haven’t seen before. “The Irishman” is a meditation on time and death. Scorsese doesn’t glamorize a gangster’s lifestyle by showing them indulge in excess. Instead, he draws our attention to the latter part of their lives, the part we rarely see on the big screen, when theirContinue reading “Melancholic Reflection in Martin Scorsese’s “The Irishman””

The Pursuit of Justice in “The Emperor’s Naked Army Marches On”

In Kazuo Hara’s shocking Japanese documentary, “The Emperor’s Naked Army Marches On”, Kenzo Okuzaki will do anything to get WWII veterans to confess to the barbaric atrocities committed in New Guinea towards the end of the war. When the conversation doesn’t seem to be going anywhere, Okuzaki resorts to violence. He punches, kicks, and wrestlesContinue reading “The Pursuit of Justice in “The Emperor’s Naked Army Marches On””

Emotional Freedom in Kieślowski’s “Three Colours: Blue”

Krzysztof Kieślowski’s Three Colours trilogy, “Blue”, White”, and “Red”, named after the colors of the French flag is themed on the French Revolutionary ideals of liberty, equality and fraternity. The first of the three films, “Blue”, tackles the concept of liberty in the everyday life of Julie, the wife of a composer, who must copeContinue reading “Emotional Freedom in Kieślowski’s “Three Colours: Blue””

Nostalgia in Federico Fellini’s “Amarcord”

In Federico Fellini’s nostalgic time capsule, “Amarcord”, we are introduced to the director’s birthplace, the seaside town of Rimini, and the colorful characters that reside in it. Only it feels like Fellini is showing us how he wants to remember this town as opposed to how it actually was. We are seeing the world throughContinue reading “Nostalgia in Federico Fellini’s “Amarcord””

Werner Herzog’s “Lessons of Darkness”

Werner Herzog once referred to “Lessons of Darkness” as a science fiction film, and I can see why. The hellish landscapes of pitch-black oil fields interrupted by fountains of fire look like something straight out of a post-apocalyptic future where man orchestrated his own demise. Strangely enough, the subject matter is not that far off;Continue reading “Werner Herzog’s “Lessons of Darkness””

The Grand Illusion in “Koyaanisqatsi”

Godfrey Reggio’s “Koyaanisqatsi” is a documentary that has been imitated countless times but never surpassed, and maybe never quite equaled either. Ron Fricke, the cinematographer of this important piece of filmmaking, went on to direct his own films like “Baraka” and “Samsara”, but for some reason they lacked the philosophical depth that a mind likeContinue reading “The Grand Illusion in “Koyaanisqatsi””

Short-Lived Moments In Steve McQueen’s “Shame”

Our days are filled with simple little interactions with complete strangers, a nod at someone passing by, a sympathetic look towards someone you may never see again, a shared smirk with some random bystander. These short-lived moments may signify the smallest measurable unit of human connection, but occasionally, they can trigger an avalanche of emotions.Continue reading “Short-Lived Moments In Steve McQueen’s “Shame””

Miscommunication in “Where is the Friend’s House?”

⁣ Few films have captured the difficulty of growing up like Abbas Kiarostami’s “Where is the Friend’s House”. In this underseen Iranian masterpiece, Babek Ahmed Poor plays an eight-year-old schoolboy running around a neighbouring village in search for his classmate’s home to return a notebook. Although, very little takes place in terms of plot, KiarostamiContinue reading “Miscommunication in “Where is the Friend’s House?””

The Sublime Cinema of Yasujirō Ozu

Yasujiro Ozu expressed grand philosophical ideas through little moments of everyday life. He is in my humble opinion, the most sensitive and disciplined director to ever hold a camera. Ozu disregarded how the rest of the world shot films and created his own cinematic language. He broke every rule there was and did it the most subtle way possible. Ozu’s films exercised the most discreetContinue reading “The Sublime Cinema of Yasujirō Ozu”

Unexpected Discoveries in Edward Yang’s “YI YI”

Edward Yang’s “Yi Yi” is a delicate masterpiece about self-reflection and the little things that make life worth living. Yang orchestrated an ensemble of social scenes that literally feature “reflection shots” of his characters. At times, you can see their reflection on windows, mirrors, or polished surfaces, but beneath the surface we see much more,Continue reading “Unexpected Discoveries in Edward Yang’s “YI YI””