Melancholic Reflection in Martin Scorsese’s “The Irishman”

Martin Scorsese brings forth a gangster film we haven’t seen before. “The Irishman” is a meditation on time and death. Scorsese doesn’t glamorize a gangster’s lifestyle by showing them indulge in excess. Instead, he draws our attention to the latter part of their lives, the part we rarely see on the big screen, when theirContinue reading “Melancholic Reflection in Martin Scorsese’s “The Irishman””

Making Connections in Kieślowski’s “Three Colours: Red”

Kieślowski’s “Red” is the most philosophically dense film in the Three Colours trilogy. In his final entry, Kieślowski effortlessly weaves everything together- very fitting for a film about making connections. An opening scene is often a film’s first shot at conveying its main themes and ideas. Here, the camera follows a telephone wire from aContinue reading “Making Connections in Kieślowski’s “Three Colours: Red””

Making Contact in the “Land of Silence and Darkness”

“If there were another World War, I wouldn’t even notice it.” “Land of Silence and Darkness” concerns itself with a very specific demographic of the population, the people who suffer from the unfortunate fate of simultaneously being deaf and blind. Without these two key senses, they are cut off from the reality of the worldContinue reading “Making Contact in the “Land of Silence and Darkness””

Werner Herzog’s “Lessons of Darkness”

Werner Herzog once referred to “Lessons of Darkness” as a science fiction film, and I can see why. The hellish landscapes of pitch-black oil fields interrupted by fountains of fire look like something straight out of a post-apocalyptic future where man orchestrated his own demise. Strangely enough, the subject matter is not that far off;Continue reading “Werner Herzog’s “Lessons of Darkness””

The Sublime Cinema of Yasujirō Ozu

Yasujiro Ozu expressed grand philosophical ideas through little moments of everyday life. He is in my humble opinion, the most sensitive and disciplined director to ever hold a camera. Ozu disregarded how the rest of the world shot films and created his own cinematic language. He broke every rule there was and did it the most subtle way possible. Ozu’s films exercised the most discreetContinue reading “The Sublime Cinema of Yasujirō Ozu”

Sustaining Love in Ingmar Bergman’s “Scenes from a Marriage”

Ingmar Bergman’s “Scenes from a Marriage” is a brutally honest study of marriage. It revolves around two human beings trying to sustain love and intimacy throughout their lives. No matter what I write, nothing will prepare you for this masterpiece. It is truly a transformative work filled with a lifetime of wisdom. “Scenes from aContinue reading “Sustaining Love in Ingmar Bergman’s “Scenes from a Marriage””

The Coziness of “The Tree of Wooden Clogs”

If I were to ever list the most well photographed films ever made, “The Tree of Wooden Clogs” would probably be right up there. The photographic images in this film are on par with the greatest paintings ever made. The cozy lighting and earthy texture within each perfectly composed shot is so vivid, rich andContinue reading “The Coziness of “The Tree of Wooden Clogs””

Life After Death In Roberto Gavaldón’s “Macario”

“We’ve got to be nicer with the dead, because we spend more time dead than alive. Anyway, we all are born to die. What do we learn here? A bust, and sometimes not even that…lots of work, many troubles… When we’re born, we’re carrying our death in the liver, or in the stomach, or hereContinue reading “Life After Death In Roberto Gavaldón’s “Macario””

Chaos in Mike Leigh’s “Naked”

Mike Leigh’s “Naked” could very well be the director’s most brilliant exercise of his unorthodox filmmaking approach. The script was created as the cast improvised during eleven weeks of rehearsal before shooting. Instead of just making a film about chaos, Leigh applied “chaos” in the actual making of his masterpiece. This may sound like anContinue reading “Chaos in Mike Leigh’s “Naked””

The Last Supper in Luis Buñuel’s “Viridiana”

Perhaps the most controversial shot in Luis Buñuel’s “Viridiana”- The composition of the shot is an imitation of Da Vinci’s The Last Supper, only it was re-enacted by homeless beggars. The Christ like figure in the middle was depicted by a street beggar who is blind. The shot implies that blindness is at the coreContinue reading “The Last Supper in Luis Buñuel’s “Viridiana””